Heresy - 'Deny The Gods - EP'
In a year where Blood Incantation, Venom Prison and Tomb Mold ran wild with death metal, it’s reassuring to see Heresy holding the guard for progressive crossover thrash that reads more like a tech-death crash-course and offers an accessible hand to hold into the murky depths of extreme metal. If this is what they’re coming up with, the future is very bright for the Costa Rican quartet.
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If you’re ballsy enough to open your album with a track entitled ‘Into The Lake Of Fire,’ you better hope it sets the listener alight in a blaze of glory. Fortunately, for Costa Rican thrash disciples Heresy, the opener to their ‘Deny The Gods’ EP is a blast-beat-riddled fretboard on fire hellbent for Satan’s hollow.

Moving away from their tried-and-tested Kreator-aping blueprint for Satanic thrash – aka last year’s promising Blasphemia – on ‘Deny The Gods,’ Heresy embrace a bludgeoning blizzard of blast-beats, complex, compelling and constructive song structures and abandon power choruses for something far more sinister. Simply put, like those before them, they’ve left their thrash roots behind, leaning somewhere in the technical death metal region, akin to contemporaries such as Rivers of Nihil and Legion of the Damned.

‘The Crowning’ is as eerily haunting as it is scene-setting with it’s wind-driven acoustic guitars plucking away harmoniously before disappearing into the hellish depths of ‘Kingdom Come’ where battering, bruising basslines and riffs made from the fires of Hell itself take you prisoner. Considering their small stature, this is a feat and half for a band like Heresy, in a year where death metal came and conquered.

Closer and title-track ‘Deny The Gods’ is a haven for fans of their previous work, throwing their penchant for fiery thrash riffs in the ring with their techy-death metal progression. Leading in from instrumental ‘Longinus,’ ‘Deny The Gods’ blackens your soul with Dennis Abrahams’ machine-gun drumming pummelling your ear drums with rapid-fire bullets whilst vocalist Jos Raley tears you apart limb from limb with his ever-evolving death growl.

In a year where Blood Incantation, Venom Prison and Tomb Mold ran wild with death metal, it’s reassuring to see Heresy holding the guard for progressive crossover thrash that reads more like a tech-death crash-course and offers an accessible hand to hold into the murky depths of extreme metal. If this is what they’re coming up with, the future is very bright for the Costa Rican quartet.

 

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