REVIEW: Converge - Beautiful Ruin
Beautiful Ruin, in a four-track six-minute stretch, solidifies once more Converge’s place among the godlike geniuses of the musical world, forever experimenting with the way in which music can be unrelentingly heavy.
Originality9.1
Lyrics9.2
Replay Value9.3
Instrumentation9.2
Impact9.3
9.2Overall Score
Reader Rating: (0 Votes)
0.0

If 2017’s The Dusk In Us was a masterwork built on the blocks of a band forever split between constructing mind-numbing heaviness and the indoctrination of the essence of beauty within their music, then 2018’s Beautiful Ruin is its disturbingly deranged cousin, destined to decimate anything and everything in its path with the precision of a military-trained sharpshooter.

The Dusk In Us was Converge at their most experimental, diverging into cleanly-sung vocals, four-to-seven minute track lengths, and a conscious attempt at curating the sound of a dying world through the rose-coloured lenses of an optimist. Beautiful Ruin rips apart the fabric of the vision so perfectly executed on The Dusk In Us, that it is somewhat of a surprise that the tracks are from the same sessions. On Beautiful Ruin, Converge do away with clean vocals and progressive structures, opting for face-melting ferocity that is unrelentingly and uncompromisingly monolithic in its presence.

Built, like much of Converge’s catalogue, on the dynamic between visionary instrumentalist and producer Kurt Ballou and vocalist Jacob Bannon’s exhilarating expressionistic growls of pain, opener Permanent Blue rips open the wound once sealed with restrained riffs and drum fills that drone around in your mind as Bannon benignly blasts your eardrums with his torturous pain.

Churches And Jails conceptually and sonically conveys the central themes that The Dusk In Us touched upon, erupting vehemently as Bannon cathartically protests “In order to starve the monster, we must behead the beast.”

Melancholia is Beautiful Ruin’s single and shining light, it’s rollicking riotous riff looping over and over and over whilst breakdowns blister the ears like burns to the skin, numbing you into a false sense of security. Slipping subconsciously into the titular closer, Melancholia is the dot between Jane Doe and The Dusk In Us the band so needed to connect. On its titular closer, Beautiful Ruin provides a platform for Ben Koller to showcase his one-of-a-kind ability to create synapse-snapping heaviness across a desolate landscape of grinded death.

Beautiful Ruin, in a four-track six-minute stretch, solidifies once more Converge’s place among the godlike geniuses of the musical world, forever experimenting with the way in which music can be unrelentingly heavy.

About The Author

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.