The Offering - Home
In ‘Home’, The Offering have delivered a carefully constructed well-crafted debut that blurs and breaks genre boundaries that dares to evolve heavy metal to its next level without losing its traditional spirit.
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In an industry crippled by the overwhelming desire to box, label and pigeonhole anything and everything, you’d be forgiven for assuming a band by the name of ‘The Offering’ with an album called ‘Home’ were nothing more than metalcore wannabes. Fortunately, they’re tastemaking trendsetters who rip up the rulebook more times than they can republish it, delivering a multi-genre album that plays on everything.

Opener ‘Waste Away’ explodes with the urgency of self titled-era Slipknot, that is, if they were fronted by Rob Halford of Judas Priest. Pulsating riffs wrap around your brain as blast beats burst brain cells, giving way to vocalist Alex Richichi who adds a Halford-inspired Killswitch Engage-sized depth to the proceedings. It’s a melting pot of genres, and that’s just a single song – the remainder of ‘Home’ follows suit in constructing boundary-blurring bangers.

‘Home’ is impossible to listen to once and only once. Admittedly, you just won’t get it. On its first listen alone, the title track’s staggering, self-indulgent 15-minute Ghost-infused Dream Theater-worshipping prog-rock opus will have you wondering if you’re listening to the same album you were a track ago. A move like that on a debut album could write off a lesser band’s career, however in the hands of The Offering and the ears of audiophiles, you’ll find it becomes an easier listen each time around. 

The musicianship on display is second-to-none. The Offering are first and foremostly songwriters obsessed with the finer details. Nothing is out of place and everything serves a purpose, whether its theatrical or structural. Guitarist Nishad George is a riff lord in waiting, empowering Alex Richichi’s honest and open lyrics on a whole new level whilst the near-militant rhythm section of bassist Spencer Metela and drummer Steve Finn provides an impenetrable backbone to the bands sheer force. 

It is in early-highlight Ultraviolence that The Offering hold their secret weapon. Armed up with the power of a locked-in missile, the explosive Slipknot-aping angst of the songs opening metallic crunch detonates into a chorus ready for arenas and festival crowds. It’s the song that’ll surely see them slip through into the mainstream. 

In ‘Home’, The Offering have delivered a carefully constructed well-crafted debut that blurs and breaks genre boundaries that dares to evolve heavy metal to its next level without losing its traditional spirit.

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