Ziggy Alberts - Laps Around The Sun
It is a struggle to find a flaw in a formula that works so well; ten tracks situated across a commute-friendly thirty-four minutes that guides you through a spectrum of emotions whilst shining the sun straight into your mind. Alberts has, in Laps Around The Sun, crafted a collection of songs on which he now can use as a platform to transcend to higher heights.
Originality7.5
Lyrics9
Replay Value9
Instrumentation8.7
Impact8.8
9Overall Score
Reader Rating: (0 Votes)
0.0

Mixing the modern pop sensibility of Ed Sheeran with the lyrical sensitivity of Ben Howard, Australia’s multi-instrumental environmentalist Ziggy Alberts finally concocts a magic formula on his fifth record – including EPs and albums – Laps Around The Sun.

There are moments on Laps Around The Sun where your consciousness slips from the stream of an album to a play-by-play soundtrack of picture-painted memories; some in black and white, and others tinted in rose-coloured glasses. Musically, you’d be forgiven for assuming – for the most part – that Ziggy Alberts is an avid subscriber of Australia’s sunshine mantra. His acoustic guitar twangs and twinges and twirls, plucking through a plethora of folk-sensitive pop-chords, making new friends with the brightness of the banjo (Worn Out) and the melancholic expressionism of the piano (3 Degrees South); allowing his music to spread across a spectrum of emotional muscle.

Ziggy has evolved lyrically too, navigating the intricacies of closing the door on one relationship and opening another, exploring everyday themes in a mature light. The resounding result is that Alberts’ lyrical prowess has grown alongside his ability to transcend his sound.

On the overwhelmingly heart-breaking Best Friend, Alberts plays the piano with a pitter-patter, passion pouring out of a man torn between old flames and new fires, millennial trends and traditionalist ideals, lamenting his own split thoughts with desperation creeping in his voice: “…and it wasn’t like we spent much time alone, there weren’t many moments that you weren’t on your phone; all of these books I’ve read and liked in your house are all hers not yours, darling I’m freaking out.” It is in this narrative commentary, these storybook moments that fictionalise real-life experiences, that Alberts folk-pop adds a depth to itself not seen before in his music.

There are parts of this album written for record, songs to be kept in their place, gift wrapped for special occasions, and there are parts of this album that are written to transcend the album in its traditional sense. The titular track is a ready-made package pop song that glimmers like the reflection of the sun in the sea, a PMA adrenaline shot that early-era Ed Sheeran would’ve been proud of whilst pre-release single Heaven is a gentle reminder of the mortality of the ones we love, and that we should cherish the moments, however major or minor they may be, that we spend with them, coming off clear as Alberts harmonically sings “I won’t give you up, there’s things I just don’t know how else to say, these things that I’m most worried about is that heaven might come down and steal you away.”

It is a struggle to find a flaw in a formula that works so well; ten tracks situated across a commute-friendly thirty-four minutes that guides you through a spectrum of emotions whilst shining the sun straight into your mind. Alberts has, in Laps Around The Sun, crafted a collection of songs on which he now can use as a platform to transcend to higher heights.

No longer restricted to the acoustic guitar that has so long been the centrepiece of his pop-folk balladry, sombre piano licks signpost the melancholy that often saturates a breakup, whilst the bop of the banjo brings in the beauty of a new chapter, a glimmer of the Australian sun shining through your stereo. Simply put, Laps Around The Sun is the autumnal album you didn’t know you needed.

About The Author

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.