Ministry - 'AmeriKKKant'
AmeriKKKant isn’t the protest album we’ve been waiting for, true. AmeriKKKant isn’t the MINISTRY comeback we expected, true. AmeriKKKant isn’t the greatest political statement in recent times, true. But, with AmeriKKKant, MINISTRY stand up and provide a nauseating standard for their peers in the wider realm of experiment metal to rise up and use their platform-elevated voices for the greater good.
Originality7
Lyrics7
Replay Value8
Instrumentation8.5
Impact7.5
We Liked...
  • WARGASM!
  • Ministry's scathing social commentary
We Didn't Like...
  • It's often too-disorienting listening experience
  • It's 20-minute long intro
7.6Overall Score
Reader Rating: (0 Votes)
0.0

Make America Great Again. Four simple words. Four simple words that have been the safety pin in the rise and rise and rise of President Donald Trump. In Trump’s eyes, he’s resurrecting America from its apparent death at the hands of its own self-inflicted sophomore Great Depression. Like Trump, Jourgensen is disgusted at the world around him, and as such is resurrecting a beast of his own: MINISTRY.

Jourgensen switched off the machines way back in 2013, following the death of Mike Scaccia in 2012 and the release of From Beer To Eternity in 2013, claiming MINISTRY’s recording days were well and truly over, the apocalypse complete. Fast forward five years and the America Jourgensen has found himself living in isn’t what it used to be, and it most certainly isn’t what the President believes it is, and so, as much as a way of protesting against the bourgeoisie as a way of making a comeback, MINISTRY, reunited and revamped, has returned, bringing with it AmeriKKKant.

Disorientation. Discomfort. Dystopia. Your mind is warped with waves of industrial noise; Jourgenson’s signature distorted vocals blind your eyes as soundbites slide through your mind. The first twenty minutes of AmeriKKKant is a magic mushroom trip you wouldn’t wish on your worst enemies down soundbite rabbit holes, sinister synths, and the sinking feeling you’re listening to an album of interludes. It doesn’t make sense and it doesn’t feel right, and perhaps that was Jourgensen’s intentions, perhaps the point is to feel as uncomfortable listening to his portrayal of America as you should feel actually living in America.

The three-minute thrash-and-run of We’re Tired Of It ushers in a new era, as if the latter twenty-five minutes of AmeriKKKant is an entirely different album, calling out so many of the aspects of the current climate of America that Jourgensen is seemingly displeased with, delivered with a display of animosity that is as uncomfortable as the miss-match pick-n-mix wall of sounds that hit you in the head like a brick at a point blank; trigger-happy scratcher, sampler, and turntablist DJ Swamp leading the charge on the disorientation.

It’s when MINISTRY channel their forefathers that AmeriKKKant actually begins to feel like its serving its purpose as a vehicle for protest. The KILLING JOKE-inspired Wargasm is the album’s mother of all bombs; it’s finest hour and it’s most dangerous weapon. Musically, it’s MINISTRY sounding the edgiest and industrialist they have in over a decade, and lyrically, it’s a scathing albeit simplistic social commentary on America’s ongoing obsession with celebritarianism and its entertainment industries treatment of Woman and the reflection it casts on the nation, as well as its disturbing love affair with war: “Death, power and sex, these are the things that we do best, which country wants it next? Not many left to molest.” It’s a cheap shot right in the gut, but it’s all the more powerful for it, especially when delivered in Jourgenson’s snarling distorted nightmare.

AmeriKKKant is an album that requires you to soak it up like a sponge in water. It requires you to simply absorb it time after time to begin to understand its disorienting wonderland, and yet, as you finally realise none of it makes sense whatsoever, you’ve found the point of it all: it doesn’t have to make sense, it’s just as uncomfortable and as confusing as the America it portrays.

AmeriKKKant isn’t the protest album we’ve been waiting for, true. AmeriKKKant isn’t the MINISTRY comeback we expected, true. AmeriKKKant isn’t the greatest political statement in recent times, true. But, with AmeriKKKant, MINISTRY stand up and provide a nauseating standard for their peers in the wider realm of experiment metal to rise up and use their platform-elevated voices for the greater good.

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